Lyrics

In Amsterdam there lived a maid
Mark well what I do say
In Amsterdam there lived a maid
And she was mistress of her trade
I'll go no more a-rovin' with you fair maid

A-rovin', a-rovin', since rovin's been my ruin-o
I'll go no more a-rovin' with you fair maid

I took that fair maid for a walk
Mark well what I do say
I took that fair maid for a walk
She said: "Young man I'd rather talk"
I'll go no more a-rovin' with you fair maid

A-rovin', a-rovin', since rovin's been my ruin-o
I'll go no more a-rovin' with you fair maid

I put my hand upon her thigh
Mark well what I do say
I put my hand upon her thigh
She said: "Young man you're rather high!"
I'll go no more a-rovin' with you fair maid

A-rovin', a-rovin', since rovin's been my ruin-o
I'll go no more a-rovin' with you fair maid

Her lovely arms were white as milk
Mark well what I do say
Her lovely arms were white as milk
Her flaxen hair was soft as silk
I'll go no more a-rovin' with you fair maid

A-rovin', a-rovin', since rovin's been my ruin-o
I'll go no more a-rovin' with you fair maid

But when I got back home from sea
Mark well what I do say
When I got back home from sea
A soldier had her on his knee
I'll go no more a-rovin' with you fair maid

A-rovin', a-rovin', since rovin's been my ruin-o
I'll go no more a-rovin' with you fair maid

A-rovin', a-rovin', since rovin's been my ruin-o
I'll go no more a-rovin' with you fair maid

As sung by The Corrie Folk Trio. This song first appeared in 1608 in a London play by Robert Heywood - 'The Rape of Lucrece' and became very popular with colonial sailors. Although some scholars claim it dates to Elizabethan times. Short versions of the song are found in Great Britain, Denmark and France. As a Sea Shanty the song was used at the pumps and windlass.

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