Lyrics

Should auld acquaintance be forgot
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot
And days of auld lang syne

For auld lang syne, my dear
For auld lang syne
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet
For auld lang syne

And surely ye'll be your pint stowp
And surely I'll be mine
And we'll tak a cup o'kindness yet
For auld lang syne

For auld lang syne, my dear
For auld lang syne
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet
For auld lang syne

We twa hae run about the braes
And pou'd the gowans fine
But we've wander'd mony a weary fit
Sin' auld lang syne

For auld lang syne, my dear
For auld lang syne
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet
For auld lang syne

We twa hae paidl'd in the burn
Frae morning sun till dine
But seas between us braid hae roar'd
Sin' auld lang syne

For auld lang syne, my dear
For auld lang syne
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet
For auld lang syne

And there's a hand, my trusty fiere
And gie's a hand o' thine
And we'll tak a right gude-willie waught
For auld lang syne

For auld lang syne, my dear
For auld lang syne
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet
For auld lang syne

Auld Lang Syne is a song with words in the Scottish dialect written by Robert Burns about 1788. Although some claim that it's an old folk song that was just written down by Burns. It has become a traditional song of friendship, and is sung at parting and at midnight on New Year's Eve to mark the passing of the old year. The title words mean "old long since," or "old long ago." The melody, based on an old Scottish folk tune, was first published together with the words in the Scots Musical Museum (1796).

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